Fiber Cable

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2018-05-17 10_54_38-Fiber Cable - Evernote

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OM1,OM2,OM3 and OM4 Multimode Fibers
OM1
* Color – Orange
* Core Size – 62.5um
* Data Rate – 1GB @ 850nm
* Distance – Up to 300 meters
* Applications – Short-Haul Networks, Local Area Networks (LANs) & Private Networks
* 62.5/125 Multimode Duplex Fiber Cable
OM2
* Color – Orange
* Core Size – 50um
* Data Rate – 1GB @ 850nm
* Distance – Up to 600 meters
* Generally used for shorter distances • 2x Distance Capacity of OM1
* Applications – Short-Haul Networks, Local Area Networks (LANs) & Private Networks
* OM2 Fiber Optic Multimode Cable

OM3 – Laser-Optimized Multimode
* Color – Aqua
* Core Size – 50um
* Date Rate – 10GB @ 850nm
* Distance – Up to 300 meters
* Uses fewer modes of light, enabling increased speeds
* Able to run 40GB or 100GB up to 100 meters utilizing a MPO connector
* Applications – Larger Private Networks
* 10 Gigabit Laser Optimized Aqua OM3 Fiber Optic Cables

OM4 – Laser-Optimized Multimode
* Color – Aqua
* Core Size – 50um
* Data Rate – 10GB @ 850nm
* Distance – Up to 550 meters
* Able to run 100GB up to 150 meters utilizing a MPO connector
* Applications – High-Speed Networks – Data Centers, Financial Centers & Corporate Campuses
* OM4 50µ – Multimode 10Giga/550m optimized Cables

What Is OM5 Fiber?
According to the ISO/IEC 11801, OM5 fiber specifies a wider range of wavelengths between 850nm and 953nm. It was created to support short wavelength division multiplexing (SWDM), which is one of the many new technologies being developed for transmitting 40Gb/s and 100Gb/s. In June 2016, ANSI/TIA-492AAAE, the new wideband multimode fiber standard, was approved for publication. And in October of 2016, OM5 fiber was announced as the official designation for cabling containing WBMMF (Wide Band Multimode Fiber) by ISO/IEC 11801. From then on, OM5 may be a potential new option for data centers that require greater link distances and higher speeds.

SC to Ethernet Converter
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SFP to Ethernet Converter
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Simplex
A simplex fiber cable consists of a single strand of glass of plastic fiber. Simplex fiber is most often used where only a single transmit and/or receive line is required between devices or when a multiplex data signal is used (bi-directional communication over a single fiber).

Duplex
A duplex fiber cable consists of two strands of glass or plastic fiber. Typically found in a “zipcord” construction format, this cable is most often used for duplex communication between devices where a separate transmit and receive are required.

APC (Angled Physical Contact)
APC connectors feature a fiber end face that is polished at an 8-degree angle
APC connectors are green
APC can only be connected to APC
APC has better performance than UPC
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UPC (Ultra Physical Contact)
UPC connectors are polished with no angle
UPC connectors are blue
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Single Mode
Single Mode fiber optic cable has a small diametral core that allows only one mode of light to propagate. Because of this, the number of light reflections created as the light passes through the core decreases, lowering attenuation and creating the ability for the signal to travel further. This application is typically used in long distance, higher bandwidth runs by Telcos, CATV companies, and Colleges and Universities.
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Multimode
Multimode fiber optic cable has a large diametral core that allows multiple modes of light to propagate. Because of this, the number of light reflections created as the light passes through the core increases, creating the ability for more data to pass through at a given time. Because of the high dispersion and attenuation rate with this type of fiber, the quality of the signal is reduced over long distances. This application is typically used for short distance, data and audio/video applications in LANs. RF broadband signals, such as what cable companies commonly use, cannot be transmitted over multimode fiber.
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